Back to top
March 7, 2018
Birth of New Neurons in the Human Hippocampus Ends in Childhood: Study Including Data from Patients with Epilepsy
Research

Adult ‘Neurogenesis’ is observed in other species, but appears not to occur in humans.

One of the liveliest debates in neuroscience over the past half century surrounds whether the human brain renews itself by producing new neurons throughout life, and whether it may be possible to rejuvenate the brain by boosting its innate regenerative capacity.

Now UC San Francisco scientists have shown that in the human hippocampus – a region essential for learning and memory and one of the key places where researchers have been seeking evidence that new neurons continue to be born throughout the lifespan – neurogenesis declines throughout childhood and is undetectable in adults.

The lab’s new research, based on careful analysis of 59 samples of human hippocampus from UCSF and collaborators around the world, suggests new neurons may not be born in the adult human brain at all. The findings present a challenge to a large body of research which has proposed that boosting the birth of new neurons could help to treat brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and depression. But the authors said it also opens the door to exciting new questions about how the human brain learns and adapts without a supply of new neurons, as in seen in mice and other animals.

The researchers found plentiful evidence of neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus during prenatal brain development and in newborns, observing an average of 1,618 young neurons per square millimeter of brain tissue at the time of birth. But the number of newborn cells sharply declined in samples obtained during early infancy: dentate gyrus samples from year-old infants contained fivefold fewer new neurons than was seen in samples from newborn infants. The decline continued into childhood, with the number of new neurons declining by 23-fold between one and seven years of age, followed by a further fivefold decrease by 13 years, at which point neurons also appeared more mature than those seen in samples from younger brains. The authors observed only about 2.4 new cells per square millimeter of DG tissue in early adolescence, and found no evidence of newborn neurons in any of the 17 adult post-mortem DG samples or in surgically extracted tissue samples from 12 adult patients with epilepsy.

Learn More

 

Related News

September 17, 2018
Characterizing Pig Hippocampus Could Improve Translational...

Researchers are developing a superior animal model of neurological conditions. The results establish the pig as a promising preclinical research...

Read More
September 11, 2018
High Electroencephalographic Seizure Exposure is Associated...

Adequate identification and management of electroencephalographic seizures with judicious use of anti-seizure medications may optimize outcomes...

Read More
September 4, 2018
Brain-Protein Study Could Lead To New Epilepsy Drugs

The research suggests the protein collybindin could play a role in the brain activity that activates or inhibits seizures.

Read More