2017

CURE Sleep and Epilepsy Award

Non-Pharmacological Manipulations Of Sleep And Circadian Rhythms To Prevent Seizures And Sudden Death In Mouse Models Of Refractory Epilepsy

Franck Kalume, PhD
Seattle Children's Hospital
 

Acute and chronic sleep and circadian disruptions are commonly present in people with treatment-resistant epilepsies. They are linked to several negative consequences, including cognitive impairment, emotional disorders, and poor seizure control and quality of life.

In planned studies, Dr. Kalume and his team will use well-established genetic mouse models of human refractory epilepsies, namely the Dravet syndrome and focal cortical dysplasia. First, they will correct sleep abnormality by manipulations of daily feeding, locomotor activity, or environmental temperature. Then, they will examine the impacts of these interventions on the course of epilepsy and sudden unexpected death phenotypes.

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