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Events > Post-Traumatic Epilepsy and Cognitive Training: Improving Quality of Life Through HOBSCOTCH

Post-Traumatic Epilepsy and Cognitive Training: Improving Quality of Life Through HOBSCOTCH

Wednesday, November 10, 2021
2:00 pm CST
Zoom

Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a form of acquired epilepsy that results from brain damage caused by a traumatic brain injury (TBI). People diagnosed with a TBI are 29 times more likely to develop epilepsy compared to the general population1. Individuals serving in the military may be especially susceptible to PTE. In fact, over 400,000 US Military personnel were diagnosed with TBI from 2010-20192, putting them at subsequent risk for developing PTE. 

This webinar provided an overview of PTE and cognitive dysfunction, as well as some strategies to help improve the quality of life of those with PTE and their caregivers. The webinar will also provide details about HOBSCOTCH (Home Based Self-Management and Cognitive Training Changes Lives), a behavioral program designed to address memory and attention problems in adults with epilepsy and discuss a clinical trial opportunity for veterans and civilians living with PTE. 

The webinar is intended for everyone, including persons with epilepsy, their friends and family, and caregivers.

1.  Herman ST. (2002) Epilepsy after brain insult: targeting epileptogenesis. Neurology 59:S21–S26. 

2. DoD Worldwide Numbers for TBI, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, 2020 

Download Full Transcript

You can also learn more about the HOBSCOTCH program by watching or listening to our Seizing Life episode Learning to Manage Cognitive Challenges for People with Epilepsy featuring Dr. Elaine Kiriakopoulos.


About the Speaker:
Dr. Elaine Kiriakopoulos is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, and the Director of the HOBSCOTCH Institute for Cognitive Health & Well-Being at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Epilepsy Center. Her research and programmatic efforts target building multisector partnerships to reduce disparities in the care of people with epilepsy, ensuring the most vulnerable populations have access to quality epilepsy care and community resources.  


Q&A with Dr. Elaine Kiriakopoulos

Could teenagers eventually participate in something like this?

I’m excited to share that we’re currently working on an adaptation for HOBSCOTCH youth, which will target adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18. We’re hoping to pilot that early in the new year as well. And so more information will come forth on that, but we feel like the program has a lot to offer adolescents as they transition to becoming adults, and helping with organizational skills, and disease management skills, as well as social skills. We’re really excited about that program. And coming along with that program is a HOBSCOTCH app, specifically for youth, targeted to youth. We think that’ll be exciting for them as well, too.

Do Georgia-based HOBSCOTCH participants need to be under the care of an Emory neurologist?

No, not at all. You can contact us, and we’ll make sure we can connect you to the team in Georgia at Emory. You can have your care with anyone in Georgia. We’re happy to have you join.

Interested in the program?

hobscotch.org

 

The information contained herein is provided for general information only and does not offer medical advice or recommendations. Individuals should not rely on this information as a substitute for consultations with qualified health care professionals who are familiar with individual medical conditions and needs. CURE Epilepsy strongly recommends that care and treatment decisions related to epilepsy and any other medical condition be made in consultation with a patient’s physician or other qualified health care professionals who are familiar with the individual’s specific health situation.